Kids

Datamation, August 1982







First, March 16, 1998







The Wall Street Journal, December 18, 1957







1000 Jokes, December 1959


1mjokes1259.JPG

1000 Jokes and its sister Dell publication, For Laughing Out Loud, were edited at various times by prolific and popular gag cartoonists Bill Yates and John Norment. Payment was very small, but it always left me with a feeling of satisfaction to be accepted by fellow cartoonists. Something akin to the feeling I would get now if I were accepted by cartoonist Bob Mankoff at The New Yorker, I guess.






Boardroom Lists, November 1983


bdrm1183.jpg This was published by Brian Kurtz in his Boardroom Lists newsletter in November 1983. You can see my original posting about Boardroom Lists here. The interesting thing about this particular cartoon is that Brian told me he liked it so much that he wanted to make a poster out of it. I told him it sounded like a great idea. The next thing I knew he published this 17" x 22" poster . . . drawn by the renowned New Yorker cartoonist Charles Barsotti! bdrmbarsottiposter.jpg I was quite taken aback and I never got a good explanation from Brian as to why he chose to ask Barsotti to re-draw my gag, instead of just blowing up my cartoon (which he had already published months before). I guess I can't fault Brian for going with a famous New Yorker cartoonist (Barsotti), instead of an almost no-name cartoonist (me). Anyway, I did eventually get my chance at a poster, too. For the opening of the 1986 baseball season, I drew a special cartoon for Boardroom Lists, and it was published (size 17" x 22", on beige poster stock paper) in May 1986. You can see it directly below.






The Chronicle of Higher Education, August 11, 1992







The Wall Street Journal, April 27, 1970


wsj042770.JPG This is another WSJ cartoon in which a lot of drawing detail was mysteriously lost in the reproduction. As I mentioned previously in a reply to a comment on another WSJ cartoon, there was a period of time when, for some strange reason, the "Pepper . . . and Salt" cartoons were appearing so faintly that they almost disappeared. I remember a few Joe Mirachi cartoons that looked like a bunch of chicken scratchings, and you could barely tell what the drawings were supposed to represent. My guess is that the WSJ was experimenting with different scanning or copying techniques, and somewhere between the original drawing and the printed cartoon, almost all of the detail was being lost. I know I hadn't changed my drawing style or tools, so it certainly wasn't anything that we cartoonists were doing differently. I also recall that the problem prompted at least one sarcastic Letter to the Editor complaining about the "disappearing" cartoons.

I'm glad to say that the glitch, whatever it was, was finally resolved and the cartoon reproduction returned to normal.






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