September 2009

Teaching K-8, August/September 2004


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Yes, I had done this same gag 41 years before, and it was published by The Wall Street Journal in 1968. The drawing is slightly (but only slightly) improved. You can see the old one right here.






"Berndt Toast Gang" Art Show and Reception


Yesterday I attended the opening reception of "Laugh Lines", a group show of cartoonists at the Art-trium Gallery in Melville, Long Island, NY. It featured original works of the "Berndt Toast Gang", the LI chapter of the National Cartoonists Society (named after a deceased member, Walter Berndt, who long ago created the comic strip "Smitty").

I had gone to the reception hoping to get a chance to chat with the likes of Mad Magazine cartoonist Mort Drucker, fellow blogger Don Orehek and even fellow blogger Mike Lynch (an ex-Berndt Toaster who now lives in New Hampshire). Unfortunately, I had to leave the reception before it was over, and didn't get a chance to see either Drucker or Orehek (I really didn't think that Mike Lynch was planning to attend from so far away). My loss, if any of them showed up later.

A little mystery developed, however. Looking around the exhibition, I noticed that there were no works by Mort Drucker to be found anywhere (press releases for the show featured his name very prominently). I questioned one of the show's organizers, who said regretfully that Mr. Drucker had pulled his work out of the show the day before. She didn't give me a reason and couldn't offer any further explanation. So, as I said, there's a little mystery . . . perhaps someone reading this is in the know and can supply details?

Anyway, here are a few photos:

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The Berndt Toast Gang . . . at least all of those in attendance before I left.

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Me and Bunny Hoest in front of a couple of her "Lockhorns" panels. Her collaborator, John Reiner, was not in attendance.

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Me checking out an original panel of "They'll Do It Every Time" by John Scaduto.

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Me straightening out an original gag cartoon panel by Don Orehek.






Al Ross, almost 98 years young


I received a note from a nephew of Al Ross, the celebrated New Yorker cartoonist. He said that his uncle is about to celebrate his 98th birthday, lives quietly in the Bronx, NY and is doing very well.

In case you don't remember, Al Ross is one of the four cartooning Roth brothers. The other three, Ben Roth, Irving Roir and Salo, have passed away (Ben Roth was the only brother who cartooned under the family name). More about the brothers here.






Advertising Age, September 12, 1983


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Explanation: The word "collateral" has a special meaning in the advertising agency world. To quote from a source on Google: "Collateral is the collection of media used to support sales of a product or service. It differs from advertising in that it is used later in the sales cycle. Common examples include: sales brochures and other printed product information, posters and signs, visual aids in sales presentations, web content, sales scripts and demonstration scripts."

So this adman, or as we would call him today, Madman, is looking for a loan and he has brought along his "collateral". Yes, I agree it's an awful pun, but I thought it worked as a gag, and apparently so did the editors at Advertising Age back in 1983.

End of Lesson Number 1 in today's Advertising 101 class.






First, May 2, 2005


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Oops, I see First dropped my signature on this one. Wonder how or why that happened?






National Business Employment Weekly, June 18, 1993


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Explanation: In just about every issue of NBEW, there was an article on the proper way to prepare a job resume, and it usually included a discussion of what was the "right" resume format for your particular situation. The three formats were "chronological", "functional" or a combination of both of those. I thought it might be funny to picture an interviewer actually keeping track of that little detail.