July 2006

The Wall Street Journal, October 27, 1982


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This is one of two similar cartoons I did during the 1982 election campaign. For the other one, see the King Features entry for August 5, 1982.






King Features "Laff-A-Day, August 5, 1982


king080582.JPG The political campaign of 1982 must have been an exciting time, at least for me. I drew this cartoon, and another one very similar to it, with a slightly different caption, and they were published within a couple of months of each other. See the Wall Street Journal entry for October 27, 1982 for the other version.

I suppose I should have been embarrassed, but I'm sure no one even noticed it at the time.

"If it's worth doing, it's worth doing twice."






Creative Computing, December 1982


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CAPTION: "Well . . . so you're a mimeograph machine operator. What's a mimeograph?"






Health Express, June 1982


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CAPTION: "Don't tell me . . . let me guess -- you've written a cook book!"






Saturday Evening Post, January 1981


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CAPTION: "Then it's agreed, gentlemen, that as soon as possible, we purchase a conference table."






Advertising Age, April 21, 1980


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CAPTION: "The agency hasn't been selected yet, but we're leaning toward Benton 'n Bowles, Young 'n Rubicam or Ogilvy 'n Mather."






The Wall Street Journal, February 22, 1974


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CAPTION: "We're never going to overcome our shyness if we don't cooperate, Mr. Higgins."

Note the WSJ's mis-spelling of "cooperate".






The Wall Street Journal, October 1, 1979


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CAPTION: "Walter! I can't believe it -- you've come back after 14 years! Did you bring the loaf of bread?"






The National Law Journal, November 26, 1990


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CAPTION: "I sentence you to perform 200 hours of small, unpleasant tasks."






The National Law Journal, August 23, 1993


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CAPTION: "The title is 'Harvey J. Nagle . . .The Minimum Security Years'."






The National Law Journal, September 24, 1998


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CAPTION: "Oh, very well, for the sake of moving things along, I'll agree to temporarily suspend my intelligence. Now please go on with your side of the story."






The National Law Journal, July 15, 1996


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More than a year after this cartoon appeared in The National Law Journal, I was surprised to see the identical gag in The New Yorker. It was in the October 13, 1997 issue and drawn by a famous New Yorker cartoonist -- same restaurant setting, exactly the same caption. Great minds thinking alike, I guess.






The National Law Journal, July 17, 1989


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Of course, Sonny Bono was still alive when this was printed in 1989, but I'm sure their marital problems were public knowledge; if not, this gag would not have made sense.






Advertising Age, February 11,1980


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CAPTION: "Actually, this is just a sideline with me -- my major emphasis is in tv and direct mail."






The Wall Street Journal, May 28, 1999


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This is one of my favorite gags. I was so proud when I came up with it. Even figuring out the math was fun.






National Lampoon, July 1984


natlamp0784.JPG I was certainly surprised when National Lampoon bought this one. I shouldn't have been, since it was right up their irreverent alley, so to speak.

Nevertheless, when I drew it, I was concerned about the controversial subject matter and decided to sign it only with ST. instead of my full name. Call me paranoiac, but I felt that if I used my obviously Jewish full name, it would bring out every religious crank and crackpot in the world. I had good reason to think this -- heck, I even got hate mail as a result of a harmless Santa cartoon that appeared in the Wall Street Journal! What I didn't realize at the time was that the famous New Yorker cartoonist and artist Saul Steinberg, who died a few years ago, also sometimes shortened his signature to ST., and it looked exactly like mine. So technically (but not practically, since our styles were so different) it was possible for someone to mistakenly think that it was a Steinberg. I hope I didn't cause him any hate mail problems.

And now I'd like to put in a little sidebar to all those "haters": Lighten up! This is strictly about humor! We have no hidden agendas! And yes, I have drawn cartoons making fun of Moses! In some small way, I think I understand what those Danish cartoonists are currently going through.






Medical Economics, July 6, 1981


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My first published cartoon in Medical Economics -- still buying from me after 25 years.






The Florida Bar News, July 15, 2000


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CAPTION: "I'd also like to remind you that when they rounded up the usual suspects, my client was not even one of those rounded up."

The Florida Bar News and Florida Bar Journal are two relatively low-paying cartoon venues, but I needed a place for all my National Law Journal rejects, and they fit the bill. Both of them bought a great number of my cartoons over the years, at least 125.






The National Law Journal, February 23, 1998


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Another National Law Journal cartoon -- a nice combination of law and literature, I thought.






The National Law Journal, July 18, 1988


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This is the first cartoon I sold to The National Law Journal. They publish one cartoon in each weekly issue, and they've used more than fifty of mine to date.






Management Review, December 1998


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CAPTION: "Are we in complete agreement, then?"

Nothing much to say about this fine publication, except that I was sorry when it folded in 2000.






National Observer, February 26, 1968


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I believe The National Observer was a Dow-Jones publication that didn't last too long. And I'm also pretty sure that Charles Preston, the editor of The Wall Street Journal's "Pepper . . . and Salt" cartoons for over fifty years (and still going), also handled the cartoons for this publication.






King Features "Laff-A-Day" August 17, 1967


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CAPTION: "Are they any good? They found ME a job, didn't they?"

Laff-A Day, the daily panel syndicated by King Features, was another market that for a long time had a popular cartoonist as Cartoon Editor -- in this case, Bob Schroeter. I don't know if he bought this one, in 1967, but I was always doubly pleased when another cartoonist who I respected OK'd my work.






National Business Employment Weekly, June 21, 1987


nbew062187.JPG I got involved pretty early when this Dow-Jones publication was launched. NBEW only printed one cartoon per weekly issue. Their editorial offices were in Princeton, New Jersey, so I didn't have any personal contact, except occasionally by phone. The first editor, Ellen Kolton, LOVED my cartoons and puchased them like they were going out of style, sometimes as many as five at a time. Of course, we cartoonists realize that this sort of thing can't possibly last, and sure enough Ellen eventually left NBEW to work for INC. magazine (which has never published cartoons, by the way). I was so devastated that I called her at INC., at their Massachusetts office, and jokingly pleaded with her to get back to NBEW, or at least convince INC. to start using cartoons. I still remember one of her kindly comments to me over the phone: "Y'know, The New Yorker publishes cartoons, too!"

Anyway, and inevitably, her replacement wasn't so enthusiastic about my work, but still kept buying at a decent pace, out of habit, I imagine. Then more editors came and went, and each one seemed even less enthusiastic. Sales came fewer and farther apart, until the publication folded in 1999. According to my records, NBEW printed 113 of my cartoons, which I consider a pretty good run.

Aside: For a while there, it seemed like there was a contest between me and New Yorker cartoonist Tom Cheney as to who would be the principal cartoonist at NBEW. In the end, Cheney won out easily. The late Henry Martin, another New Yorker cartoonist, also appeared regularly. When a small paperback of the best cartoons from NBEW was printed, I had six cartoons included, and Cheney had about ten times as many.

Cartoon Editors should never change jobs -- unless they're not buying my cartoons, of course!






True, January 1962


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CAPTION: "Is a GY475 tube very expensive?"

Another one sold to Bill McIntyre at TRUE magazine. TRUE was one of the regular in-person stops on Wednesday in Manhattan -- "Look Day" for the local cartoonists. "Look Day" at The New Yorker right now is Tuesday -- go figure.






Stock Market, October 1983


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CAPTION: "No, you're not being replaced by a computer, Hoskins . . . you're being replaced by an electric paper shredder."






Stock Market, May 1978


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CAPTION: ". . . and the Board of Directors voted to wish you a speedy recovery -- 5 to 4, with two abstentions."






Stock Market, December 1980


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CAPTION: "Our bellies are up 12 1/2 cents."

Stock Market was publishing quite a few of my cartoons at one time. In fact, for a while I even had a featured by-line, under the title "The Bottom Line". The magazine folded, and that was the end of that.






Saturday Review, October 1981


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Never could figure out why The Saturday Review (of Literature) bought this "blind umpire" sports cartoon, but was very glad that they did.






Datamation, March 1981


datam0381.JPGCAPTION: "Miss Farber, would you please tell me what this piece of paper is doing on my desk?"
This cartoon from Datamation is by far the most reprinted of my cartoons. It was first picked up by Business Week for an article they were doing on "The Paperless Office". After that, the reprint requests just came in thick and fast.

I used the name Farber as a silent tribute to radio talk personality Barry Farber, who I used to listen to a lot while I was cartooning.






1000 Jokes, December 1959


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1000 Jokes and its sister Dell publication, For Laughing Out Loud, were edited at various times by prolific and popular gag cartoonists Bill Yates and John Norment. Payment was very small, but it always left me with a feeling of satisfaction to be accepted by fellow cartoonists. Something akin to the feeling I would get now if I were accepted by cartoonist Bob Mankoff at The New Yorker, I guess.






National Business Employment Weekly, December 25, 1988


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Note the date of publication -- Christmas Day, 1988. The quote, of course, is from "A Visit From Saint Nicholas". Because of its literary merit, I was hoping to sell this gag to the New Yorker, but many months before Christmas, I casually included it in a batch to NBEW -- and to my dismay the editor snapped it up. So Cartoonist/Editor Lee Lorenz at The New Yorker never had a crack at it. My advice to cartoonists: don't send it out if you don't want it sold!






Barron's February 17, 1997


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The first cartoon of mine that was printed by Barron's, another Dow-Jones publication (D-J's Wall Street Journal and National Business Employment Weekly both extensively bought my stuff).






The National Law Journal September 3, 1998


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Another of many cartoons I've done for The National Law Journal (the first one was published ten years earlier, in 1988). I particularly like this one because R.J.Nagle is my son-in-law -- but he's not a lawyer.






True, September 1958


true09581.jpgCAPTION: "Well, yes, it is a sort of a price war. First he raised his price, then I raised my price . . ."

A "gas price war" cartoon that was funny in 1958, when gas sold for about 29 cents a gallon. Is it still funny now? Only as nostalgia, I guess. The Cartoon Editor of True was Bill McIntyre, and his favorite cartoonist was VIP (Virgil Partch). You could count on at least one VIP in every issue. Both McIntyre and Partch are deceased.